Mitigating arsenic crisis in the developing world: Role of robust, reusable and selective hybrid anion exchanger (HAIX)

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Screenshot 2018-11-13 15.44.19.png

Mitigating arsenic crisis in the developing world: Role of robust, reusable and selective hybrid anion exchanger (HAIX)

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In trying to address the public health crisis from the lack of potable water, millions of tube wells have been installed across the world. From these tube wells, natural groundwater contamination from arsenic regularly puts at risk the health of over 100 million people in South and Southeast Asia. Although there have been many research projects, awards and publications, appropriate treatment technology has not been matched to ground level realities and water solutions have not scaled to reach millions of people. For thousands of people from Nepal to India to Cambodia, hybrid anion exchange (HAIX) resins have provided arsenic-safe water for up to nine years. Synthesis of HAIX resins has been commercialized and they are now available globally. Robust, reusable and arsenic-selective, HAIX has been in operation in rural communities over numerous cycles of exhaustion–regeneration. All necessary testing and system maintenance is organized by community-level water staff. Removed arsenic is safely stored in a scientifically and environmentally appropriate manner to prevent future hazards to animals or people. Recent installations have shown the profitability of HAIX-based arsenic treatment, with capital payback periods of only two years in ideal locations. With an appropriate implementation model, HAIX-based treatment can rapidly scale and provide arsenic-safe water to at-risk populations.

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